Development in the Commonwealth Caribbeans after a half-century of independence: insights from transnational and regional perspectives

Author(s): 
Publication Date: 
01 January 2013
Publisher: 
Taylor & Francis
Publication Place: 
Oxford
Publication Language: 
EN
Appearing in: 
Contemporary Politics
Volume: 
19
Issue: 
3
Pages: 
293-303
DOI: 
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13569775.2013.804152
Abstract: 

After 50 years of formal independence in the anglophone Caribbean, this article suggests gains for both analysis and policy may be made by something of a paradigm shift towards a focus on transnational and regional relations. This is especially so for the myriad small, particularly island, states which have always been relatively ‘open’ especially as contemporary governance demands proliferate as indicated in the first section below. And it holds potential for island communities in the Indian and Pacific Oceans as well as the Caribbean, especially for those associated with inter- and non-state Commonwealth networks; these now include not only the original established ‘Dominions’ of Australia, Britain and Canada but also 2/5 BRICS, or 25% of the G20. A focus on the transnational and regional helps to transcend the old binary of ‘vulnerability’ versus ‘resilience’.